Archive for August 25th, 2003

Court names new CNE

August 25, 2003

The Constitutional Hall of the Venezuelan Supreme Court named tonight by a unanimous vote the five principal members of the Comision Nacional Electoral (CNE). The members are: Oscar Bataglini González, Jorge Rodríguez, Francisco Carrasquero, Sobeida Mejía y Ezequiel Zamora. Bataglini was proposed by Chavez’ MVR, Francisco Carrasquero (President) is a former member of the Court and President of a private University in Zulia State and Dean of Law at University of Zulia. Carrasquero was a member of Movimiento al Socialismo (MAS) and is considered to be a serious lawyer. Ezequiel Zamora was a member of the CNE, he is consiered to be a technical person and was proposed by the CNE’s workers.  Zamora was a member of the CNE for a number of years way before Chavez was President. Sobeida Mejia was proposed by Accion Democractica and Jorge Rodriguez was proposed by Chavez’ MVR. Thus, the CNE appears to be a balanced Board with Francisco Carrasquero being the “neutral” card. (thisis no way to improve a democracy). The Court also named a “Council of Political Participation” composed of Teodoro Petkoff (former Minsiter of Planning) Carlos Delgado Chapellin (former President of the CNE), Hernando Grisanti (Penal lawyer, author of many texts, I am not sure about his politics) and Guillermo Garcia Ponce who presides MVR’s Tactical Command of the Revolution.


All I can say is that for six months Venezuelans have not had the right to vote. The Supreme Court took away that right in February and it was restored tonight by the same Court. Let’s see if the new CNE allows us to vote or whether this is nothing but more manipulation of this battered democracy.

Exaggeration

August 25, 2003

This picture is an exaggeration, but very cute….



How insecure is Caracas? Judge for yourself…

Another picture, of our reality, our marches and Chavez’.

August 25, 2003


I said that Chavez march on Saturday was large, but certainly smaller than the opposition march. I did not want to say much more than that since, at this point, I think that all that really matters is that we have a referendum and count each other. Obviously, if Chavez were as popular as he thinks, it would be to his advantage to have the referendum take place. By winning it, he could truly say, for once, that he had a mandate for his revolution. But he knows he does not. He never has. When people voted for him in 1998, they were voting for a change, not a revolution. He promised to eradicate corruption, reduce crime and improve the lot of the poor. He has done neither. Instead he set the country in a path of hate and his fake revolution, without any content, where holding on to political life and protecting your corrupt friends is now the main objective. That is why opposition marches are larger. Proof is above. This is a picture of one of the six opposition marches on Wednesday of last week. This was not the largest of the six. You can see how big it was. If you look carefully way back at your right there are still people there flowing in from the right. This march lasted more than two hours very much just like that. But what is interesting is that in the newspaper pictures you can see that Chavez’ rally thinned out once you got beyond the Museum of Science. The picture above, static like that, has more people than in Chavez’ rally. But this is irrelevant anyway, let’s have a referendum and let’s see where the millions of Chavistas are. If they win, we shut up, if we win, the revolution is dead. That is the problem, Chavez does not want his personal dream to be over, but his personal dream is a nightmare to over 80% of the Venezuela population. Unfortunately for him, for the other 20%, close to five years later is still only a hope and nothing tangible yet, despite billions of dollars in oil income, despite controlling the whole economic and the whole political system (Except the Central Bank and the opposition). As simple as that.  

Another picture, of our reality, our marches and Chavez’.

August 25, 2003


I said that Chavez march on Saturday was large, but certainly smaller than the opposition march. I did not want to say much more than that since, at this point, I think that all that really matters is that we have a referendum and count each other. Obviously, if Chavez were as popular as he thinks, it would be to his advantage to have the referendum take place. By winning it, he could truly say, for once, that he had a mandate for his revolution. But he knows he does not. He never has. When people voted for him in 1998, they were voting for a change, not a revolution. He promised to eradicate corruption, reduce crime and improve the lot of the poor. He has done neither. Instead he set the country in a path of hate and his fake revolution, without any content, where holding on to political life and protecting your corrupt friends is now the main objective. That is why opposition marches are larger. Proof is above. This is a picture of one of the six opposition marches on Wednesday of last week. This was not the largest of the six. You can see how big it was. If you look carefully way back at your right there are still people there flowing in from the right. This march lasted more than two hours very much just like that. But what is interesting is that in the newspaper pictures you can see that Chavez’ rally thinned out once you got beyond the Museum of Science. The picture above, static like that, has more people than in Chavez’ rally. But this is irrelevant anyway, let’s have a referendum and let’s see where the millions of Chavistas are. If they win, we shut up, if we win, the revolution is dead. That is the problem, Chavez does not want his personal dream to be over, but his personal dream is a nightmare to over 80% of the Venezuela population. Unfortunately for him, for the other 20%, close to five years later is still only a hope and nothing tangible yet, despite billions of dollars in oil income, despite controlling the whole economic and the whole political system (Except the Central Bank and the opposition). As simple as that.  

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