Archive for February, 2004

The Economist: Chavez frustrates the petiotioners

February 28, 2004

From The Economist:


Time was when Latin American rulers would lose an election but still manage to win it during the vote count. But it is a novelty for a vote to be stolen before it has even been scheduled. According to Venezuela’s opposition, that is just what the country’s increasingly authoritarian president, Hugo Chávez, is trying to do with a recall referendum which-if it ever happens-could bring his populist government to an abrupt end. Ironically, Mr Chávez was once a great enthusiast for the idea of recall referendums, an innovation in a new constitution he sponsored in 1999. No longer. The electoral council (CNE) was slow to issue rules for referendums, so two previous opposition attempts were ruled invalid. Last year, the CNE finally drew up guidelines; these have been followed by the Democratic Co-ordinator, the opposition umbrella group. On four days late last year, the Co-ordinator gathered over 3m signatures calling for the plebiscite. The CNE’s rules were so strict that, for example, petition forms were printed on bank security paper to avoid fraud. The signature-gathering went smoothly, witnessed by officials from the government, the opposition and the CNE. But on day three, when it became clear that the number of signatures would easily exceed the 2.4m (20% of the electorate) required, Mr Chávez denounced the exercise as a “mega-fraud”. If the CNE called the referendum, he would not recognise it. But the president then backtracked, saying he would respect the council’s decision and calling on the opposition to do the same. Why? Perhaps because the CNE’s board, three of whose five members appear to support the government, is itself throwing up obstacles. It is already a month late in ruling on whether a referendum should take place. And it has been making up new rules as it goes along. On February 24th, the CNE ruled that signatures will be annulled if the accompanying personal details were penned by another hand (eg, if they were taken down by the referendum organisers)-unless the signatories individually confirm during a five-day period that they really did sign. That should be enough to abort the referendum. The Organisation of American States (OAS), which has observed the process, is said to have discussed pulling out if what it has called “excessive technicalities” take precedence over the will of the electorate. It is no mere onlooker. Together with the Carter Centre, headed by Jimmy Carter, a former American president, it did much to persuade the opposition to take the referendum route (despite its fears that Mr Chávez would bend the rules). Both are guarantors of a deal struck in May 2003 in which government and opposition agreed to abide by the constitution. “No tricks!”, warned Mr Carter at the time. Absent a referendum, many would argue that Mr Chávez was no longer ruling as a democrat. Venezuela would risk expulsion from the OAS for violating its Democratic Charter. That decision might be closely fought. Mr Chávez would hope for many votes from the small states of the English-speaking Caribbean, to whom he supplies cheap oil. He recently visited neighbouring Guyana, where he downplayed Venezuela’s claim to that country’s Essequibo territory. A sudden about-turn aimed at forestalling diplomatic isolation, said opponents. But if forced to choose between isolation and power, Mr Chávez might prefer to walk alone.

Guardia NAZI ONAL

February 28, 2004

Somebody sent me this picture of the National Guard in the morning before the march arrived. It simply had a caption: GUARDIA NAZI ONAL



Obviously overkill for a peaceful march…

Posters from yesterday’s march

February 28, 2004


CNE: National Fraud Commission                   Chavez look at yourself in thismirror if there is no recall.



JR: Listen to your father’s voice and the people’s Recall now!   CNE: Thiefs you stole my right

More Pictures from the march

February 28, 2004








Lots of pictures in the pictures and posters section

February 28, 2004

It’s almost 2 AM, but the adrenaline is still flowing, so I have had time to look at all the pictures I took. Lots of interesting ones, but don’t want to load up the main page, so I will place them all as I process them in the pictures section and there are some posters too. Check back in a little bit if they are not there yet. Tomorrow I will add comments to all pictures, tonight I am too wiped out to think. Takes a while to upload them. Meanwhile enjoy these two to make the post less dry:


Repression up close

February 28, 2004



This is what the Minsiter of Justice must have been referring to about peopel insulting the National Guardsmen. From top to bottom, left to right: 1) Dangerous lady armed with venezuelan flag approaches the National Guardsmen to ask why she has no right to circulate freely. Female Guardswoman, hits her with baton, except lady grabs it and takes it from her falling to the ground. 2) As she gets up they hit her and 3) Push her. By now there are more Guards around and she is thrown to the ground in 4). Even as she is on teh ground surrounded by seven Guardsmen, she is holding on to the baton 5) As the Guardsmen realize the press is taping the whole thing they surround the lady to block the view in 6). Lady was hit repeteadly on her back.


All I can say is lady, you have all my respect and I am glad you are on my side! To the guards: Shame on you!

Not just another day

February 27, 2004

 


I naively left home this morning with a simple plan: Go to work, stay until the middle of the march went by my building, come back finish what I had to do, go home. I had my two weapons :my camera and my cell phone. No need to take my tear gas mask. Not only has it been quite a while since I have needed, but it would seem such a bad moment to use force against us.


 


Not only is the G-15 (really G-6 today, G-3 by tomorrow), but the world is watching how Chavez handles the petition for the recall referendum. These naďve thoughts crossed my mind despite having seen the pictures of the military deployment surrounding the theater where the G-15 meeting is taking place. Thanks to William for telling us in the comments that a good set of pictures of the Government’s preparations are here. This is what I saw yesterday but really, I was not intimidated, or thought much would happen today.


 


As I work in the morning I keep watch on the events. The March itself I don’t have to pay attention to. The march goes right by my building so I will know exactly when to join it. The theater where the G-15 meeting is taking place is surrounded by the military, these are not just soldiers, and there are tanks, small vehicles and guns all over the place on all sides. I guess Mogabe must have lots of enemies.


 


As usual, the opposition can not get even close to the theater where it wants to hand in a letter to those attending about the steps taken by the Chavez Government to stop their Constitutional rights to a referendum on the President’s matter. Not even a delegation is allowed to get close to it. Thus, I am surprised when pro-Chavez groups are not only allowed to get close to the theater, but are actually surrounding it in such a way that you see lots of green military uniforms and lots of red t-shirts of Chavez supporters.


 


Amazingly, that pitiful character German Mundarain, the People’s Ombudsman (PO), appears on TV telling us that the Chavistas are allowed to be there because all they want is to salute the foreign visitors, while the opposition wants violence. Not only that, but he appears to define spaces for the two different Venezuelans. We are simply not equal in the eyes of the man supposed to defend our rights. He mentions that the opposition is talking about “rebellion”, leaving me wondering what this guy has in his brains, if anything. This is 10 AM, the march has not started.


 


After the PO, Teodoro Petkoff comes on. I wished he was saying more than his Editorials, but I have no time to listen, I have to work, later a friend calls from the States while I am at the march and reads me Teodoro’s statements in El Universal;


 


“The military deployment is a show of political weakness”. “The regimen can not have a confrontation with its own people” “ people are marching, they do not intend to take over the theater” The right to demonstrate is guaranteed by the Constitution”” Only with the military deployment those visiting us have seen that there is a profound crisis and a President with no legitimacy in front of his people”.


 


And the usually balanced Petkoff adds:


 


“I think that we have to persist in the protest using all instances and I am sure that we are not in the definite moment of the fight, but that there will be new moments for it”


 


Heady stuff to hear while you are marching and getting tear gassed, but I am getting ahead of myself.


 


As I ignore Petkoff, the march goes by my building in Avenida Francisco de Miranda. It is always such a sight to see the men and the women, the young and the old, marching, posters and flags in hands. Today there is a difference though. There is less singing, less chanting. People are like really marching, moving fast with lots of determination. Only the trucks with the sound system drown the noise of the crowd marching and slows it down in the process.


 


I have barely seen the front of the march go by, when TV stations switch to Mariperez some four-five miles away. There ,a dozen people hang around, you see reporters on the floor taking pictures and suddenly, tear gas canisters are flying around, a person is taken injured on a motorcycle and I am wondering what the Hell is going on. As I see the blood on the person which turned out to be a reporter, I get mad, get up and leave to join the marchers.  


 


The mood is festive as I join. I see two older people in their wheelchair marching along. Most people carry signs alluding to their signature in the petition. These two are cool:



 


 (Someone sent the second one). As we got closer to the end, where the military is, things slow down. People are talking about lots of tear gas, so I see a street vendor selling medical masks and I get one for Bs. 2,000 ($1 at the official rate), before the end of the afternoon the price actually doubled.


 


The adrenaline begins flowing as I get up close. It is different to see the National Guard up close than on TV, they have these vests that make them look like Robocop, which you can see in the post below.


 


I begin taking pictures. The Guards seem to be staying back as I do, then all of a sudden and without warning, they begin throwing the heaviest barrage of tear gas canisters I have seen in my life. It is very nasty, they are not throwing it to keep us back, and they are throwing it over our heads so that canisters fall in the middle of the crowd. People panic, fall to the ground, some vomit. Everyone helps each other. Then they get up, get some air and go back. At one point I could barely breath.


 


This is what is different this time around people are really pissed (arrechos in Venezuelan slang) I see men, women, more men than women. But I also see older ladies, there is black, white, mestizo and whatever. Some oligarhs too.  Everyone is crying, people are sharing the Menthol, the Vinegar, taking care of those on the ground. The whole Avenida Libertador is full of people. They go back, rest and come back.


 


In a while the National Guard strategy becomes fairly simple, they allow us to get ahead, the helicopter goes by, tells them where we are, and they attack. The wind helps them as the gas is blown right towards us. People begin building barricades (see pictures below). At some point (no time for checking my watch) the wind shifts. The Guards throw the canisters but it blows right back to them. We hold our ground for quite a while.


 


There are all sorts of rumors during the march; Lula has left in disgust, other demonstrations and rallies somewhere else, even some Generals rising against the Government in the West of the country.  Reportedly the CNE may be reconsidering how to fix the problem with the forms with the same calligraphy for the data.


 


As the battle continues, the wind shifts again. I notice the helicopter go by and the nastiest attack takes place. This time around motorcycles attack us, two guards on each, throwing canisters all over the place. People actually panic, there is no place to run, the gas is nasty, I mean really nasty! Hard to breath, many ladies on the floor. Not much help, everyone is doing badly and the canisters keep coming. The wind shifts and that gives people some real breathing room. Most people do not go back back this time around. The motorcycles introduces something that is dangerous to fight. The hardcore stay until after dark. Most marchers leave.


 


Afterwards I learn that the strongest attack took place just when all TV stations were forced to transmit Chavez’s speech in front of the G-15. What a coward! Fortunately, the TV stations tape it for everyone to see. An hour and a half later I get back to my office; there is Chavez in an expensive suit, with an expensive watch in the luxury of the theater talking about justice, fairness and the people. I think of Nero playing the harp as Rome burned. He looks just like that. Pathetic. All he has done in the last five years is introduce a Constitution which he has little respect for. Even the use of chemicals is banned in it. (Thanks Alfredo!). And the right to peaceful protest is guaranteed. Check it, it is in there somewhere. (Even though I hate it, it’s the only one we have, so I read it a lot, it’s the law!)


 


By now, TV stations are showing tapes of the biggest acts of repression. Then the Attorney General goes on TV and says it is all the oppositions fault. He has said nothing about the application of the law by the CNE and our signatures, but he is quick to the gun on this issue. Impunity is the name of the game. The Minsiter of the Interior of Justice, the big Pinocchio of April 2002, says the same thing. Imaine he says. People were actually insulting the Guards. This can’t be!. Insulting people deserved to be gssed. What is the penalty for the lie he told us in April 2002 that Chavez had resigned? At least a lobotomy or lower.  I agree with Gen. Rincon. This can’t be. People should not have to wave flasg at the National Guard, or ask for tehir rights, or even insult them or throw stones.  But it is. And it will continue until we get our rights back.


 


It was simply another day. Rough, but somehow, I have a sense of accomplishment. We were peaceful. They weren’t. Chavez meant the G-15 meeting to be his showcase. It wasn’t. The military repression surrounded them. Only Mugabe could have been proud of the display of force. Lula and Kirschner have been on the side of the repressed, they could not have been happy. Unfortunately people died or are hurt. So we also lost, one death or injured is one too many. Imagine a simple alternative: A committee of the opposition is allowed to go forward meet with Lula or whomever, hand in the document and we could have all been home by 2 PM. Too easy for the minds of fascists.


 


I thank Daniel for actually worrying about my whereabouts so much that he posted about it, and for the many that sent e-mails asking if I was OK, including you Mari, so far away in space and time. We are just OK, it was not simply just another day.

Not just another day

February 27, 2004

 


I naively left home this morning with a simple plan: Go to work, stay until the middle of the march went by my building, come back finish what I had to do, go home. I had my two weapons :my camera and my cell phone. No need to take my tear gas mask. Not only has it been quite a while since I have needed, but it would seem such a bad moment to use force against us.


 


Not only is the G-15 (really G-6 today, G-3 by tomorrow), but the world is watching how Chavez handles the petition for the recall referendum. These naďve thoughts crossed my mind despite having seen the pictures of the military deployment surrounding the theater where the G-15 meeting is taking place. Thanks to William for telling us in the comments that a good set of pictures of the Government’s preparations are here. This is what I saw yesterday but really, I was not intimidated, or thought much would happen today.


 


As I work in the morning I keep watch on the events. The March itself I don’t have to pay attention to. The march goes right by my building so I will know exactly when to join it. The theater where the G-15 meeting is taking place is surrounded by the military, these are not just soldiers, and there are tanks, small vehicles and guns all over the place on all sides. I guess Mogabe must have lots of enemies.


 


As usual, the opposition can not get even close to the theater where it wants to hand in a letter to those attending about the steps taken by the Chavez Government to stop their Constitutional rights to a referendum on the President’s matter. Not even a delegation is allowed to get close to it. Thus, I am surprised when pro-Chavez groups are not only allowed to get close to the theater, but are actually surrounding it in such a way that you see lots of green military uniforms and lots of red t-shirts of Chavez supporters.


 


Amazingly, that pitiful character German Mundarain, the People’s Ombudsman (PO), appears on TV telling us that the Chavistas are allowed to be there because all they want is to salute the foreign visitors, while the opposition wants violence. Not only that, but he appears to define spaces for the two different Venezuelans. We are simply not equal in the eyes of the man supposed to defend our rights. He mentions that the opposition is talking about “rebellion”, leaving me wondering what this guy has in his brains, if anything. This is 10 AM, the march has not started.


 


After the PO, Teodoro Petkoff comes on. I wished he was saying more than his Editorials, but I have no time to listen, I have to work, later a friend calls from the States while I am at the march and reads me Teodoro’s statements in El Universal;


 


“The military deployment is a show of political weakness”. “The regimen can not have a confrontation with its own people” “ people are marching, they do not intend to take over the theater” The right to demonstrate is guaranteed by the Constitution”” Only with the military deployment those visiting us have seen that there is a profound crisis and a President with no legitimacy in front of his people”.


 


And the usually balanced Petkoff adds:


 


“I think that we have to persist in the protest using all instances and I am sure that we are not in the definite moment of the fight, but that there will be new moments for it”


 


Heady stuff to hear while you are marching and getting tear gassed, but I am getting ahead of myself.


 


As I ignore Petkoff, the march goes by my building in Avenida Francisco de Miranda. It is always such a sight to see the men and the women, the young and the old, marching, posters and flags in hands. Today there is a difference though. There is less singing, less chanting. People are like really marching, moving fast with lots of determination. Only the trucks with the sound system drown the noise of the crowd marching and slows it down in the process.


 


I have barely seen the front of the march go by, when TV stations switch to Mariperez some four-five miles away. There ,a dozen people hang around, you see reporters on the floor taking pictures and suddenly, tear gas canisters are flying around, a person is taken injured on a motorcycle and I am wondering what the Hell is going on. As I see the blood on the person which turned out to be a reporter, I get mad, get up and leave to join the marchers.  


 


The mood is festive as I join. I see two older people in their wheelchair marching along. Most people carry signs alluding to their signature in the petition. These two are cool:



 


 (Someone sent the second one). As we got closer to the end, where the military is, things slow down. People are talking about lots of tear gas, so I see a street vendor selling medical masks and I get one for Bs. 2,000 ($1 at the official rate), before the end of the afternoon the price actually doubled.


 


The adrenaline begins flowing as I get up close. It is different to see the National Guard up close than on TV, they have these vests that make them look like Robocop, which you can see in the post below.


 


I begin taking pictures. The Guards seem to be staying back as I do, then all of a sudden and without warning, they begin throwing the heaviest barrage of tear gas canisters I have seen in my life. It is very nasty, they are not throwing it to keep us back, and they are throwing it over our heads so that canisters fall in the middle of the crowd. People panic, fall to the ground, some vomit. Everyone helps each other. Then they get up, get some air and go back. At one point I could barely breath.


 


This is what is different this time around people are really pissed (arrechos in Venezuelan slang) I see men, women, more men than women. But I also see older ladies, there is black, white, mestizo and whatever. Some oligarhs too.  Everyone is crying, people are sharing the Menthol, the Vinegar, taking care of those on the ground. The whole Avenida Libertador is full of people. They go back, rest and come back.


 


In a while the National Guard strategy becomes fairly simple, they allow us to get ahead, the helicopter goes by, tells them where we are, and they attack. The wind helps them as the gas is blown right towards us. People begin building barricades (see pictures below). At some point (no time for checking my watch) the wind shifts. The Guards throw the canisters but it blows right back to them. We hold our ground for quite a while.


 


There are all sorts of rumors during the march; Lula has left in disgust, other demonstrations and rallies somewhere else, even some Generals rising against the Government in the West of the country.  Reportedly the CNE may be reconsidering how to fix the problem with the forms with the same calligraphy for the data.


 


As the battle continues, the wind shifts again. I notice the helicopter go by and the nastiest attack takes place. This time around motorcycles attack us, two guards on each, throwing canisters all over the place. People actually panic, there is no place to run, the gas is nasty, I mean really nasty! Hard to breath, many ladies on the floor. Not much help, everyone is doing badly and the canisters keep coming. The wind shifts and that gives people some real breathing room. Most people do not go back back this time around. The motorcycles introduces something that is dangerous to fight. The hardcore stay until after dark. Most marchers leave.


 


Afterwards I learn that the strongest attack took place just when all TV stations were forced to transmit Chavez’s speech in front of the G-15. What a coward! Fortunately, the TV stations tape it for everyone to see. An hour and a half later I get back to my office; there is Chavez in an expensive suit, with an expensive watch in the luxury of the theater talking about justice, fairness and the people. I think of Nero playing the harp as Rome burned. He looks just like that. Pathetic. All he has done in the last five years is introduce a Constitution which he has little respect for. Even the use of chemicals is banned in it. (Thanks Alfredo!). And the right to peaceful protest is guaranteed. Check it, it is in there somewhere. (Even though I hate it, it’s the only one we have, so I read it a lot, it’s the law!)


 


By now, TV stations are showing tapes of the biggest acts of repression. Then the Attorney General goes on TV and says it is all the oppositions fault. He has said nothing about the application of the law by the CNE and our signatures, but he is quick to the gun on this issue. Impunity is the name of the game. The Minsiter of the Interior of Justice, the big Pinocchio of April 2002, says the same thing. Imaine he says. People were actually insulting the Guards. This can’t be!. Insulting people deserved to be gssed. What is the penalty for the lie he told us in April 2002 that Chavez had resigned? At least a lobotomy or lower.  I agree with Gen. Rincon. This can’t be. People should not have to wave flasg at the National Guard, or ask for tehir rights, or even insult them or throw stones.  But it is. And it will continue until we get our rights back.


 


It was simply another day. Rough, but somehow, I have a sense of accomplishment. We were peaceful. They weren’t. Chavez meant the G-15 meeting to be his showcase. It wasn’t. The military repression surrounded them. Only Mugabe could have been proud of the display of force. Lula and Kirschner have been on the side of the repressed, they could not have been happy. Unfortunately people died or are hurt. So we also lost, one death or injured is one too many. Imagine a simple alternative: A committee of the opposition is allowed to go forward meet with Lula or whomever, hand in the document and we could have all been home by 2 PM. Too easy for the minds of fascists.


 


I thank Daniel for actually worrying about my whereabouts so much that he posted about it, and for the many that sent e-mails asking if I was OK, including you Mari, so far away in space and time. We are just OK, it was not simply just another day.

Rough day, a lot of repression

February 27, 2004

One should not write when one is charged up. I should not write. I will let the pictures speak for themselves. There was a lot of unnecessary repression today. Chavez was like Nero in burning Rome, talking about peace and justice while this was going on outside. As I write, 7 PM Caracas time, it is dark, but there are still people out there challenging the National Guard. That was the big difference today. In all previous marches, once the tear gas and plastic bullets began, people would leave. They did not today. They stayed massively. And they were repressed without mercy. I saw women thrown to the ground, I saw Guards shoot tear gas canisters to a person less than six feet away. I saw the National Guard use strategies to trap people in the gas. I saw people vomit, get up and go back for more. Two people died and twenty are hospitalized. I will write more later, here are some pictures, too many. The page will be very heavy, but I think it is worth it.







CNE Directors: Rectify by Teodoro Petkoff

February 26, 2004

 


Once again, today’s Tal Cual Editorial which expands on some of the things I said yesterday about Dr. Rodriguez’ statements and asks the CNE to reconsider (the boldface is Tal Cual’s emphasis):


 


CNE Director Jorge Rodríguez affirmed yesterday that no regulations for the petition for the recall referendum had been modified after they were issued. This is not true. The resolution by the CNE by which the regulations were issued and named “Regulations to regulate the recall referendum processes to revoke the mandates of popularly elected positions” was approved on September 25th. 2003 and appeared published in the Electoral Gazette on September 26th. In it, there is no reference to the forms with the same calligraphy for the data of those signing the petition. In November, on a date as yet not specified, a directive was approved aimed at the observers of the process of gathering the signatures, which were persons appointed by the CNE and should have followed the instructions. In these instructions, in its second page, there is a note that says:” Important: The data in the form for gathering signatures mentioned before, should be registered by the person signing, after the presentation of the national ID card (even if it has expired) in front of the agent collecting the signatures”.



This note alters substantially Article 29 of said regulations which in its number 5 establishes that a signature will be invalidated “if it is determined that the same signature comes from the same person”. Neither in that article nor in any other article of the same, there is even the slightest mention to the effect that the signatures for which the data is not filled by the person signing will be invalidated. This directive changed in November, a rule of the game issued in September. Or not, Dr. Rodríguez? It is also true and should be said, that the CNE Published in Ultimas Noticias (a local newspaper) the day before and during the two first days of both petition drives, a full page ad, with instruction for those signing , which in its part 5 said: “You should fill the form with your data”. But this is even worse: The same days of the signature collection, those signing were informed of a rule, which had never been mentioned previously.

On the other hand, the resolution about “Norms to regulate the activities of the CNE observers…and of the collection agents…”, approved on October 30th. 2003, obligates the “observers” in part E of section 4 to “Be present in the signature collection and to note the observations that may arise according to the terms included in article 25 of “the regulations to regulate the recall referendum processes to revoke the mandates of popularly elected positions” Since no Director of the CNE has informed us that the CNE observers had noted any observations during the filling of the “planas” (forms with the same calligraphy), it should be presumed that none of them considered worthy of mention any observation about such “planas”. That article 25 establishes that “The CNE observers will limit their role to be present at the gathering of the signatures…and sign and fill out the cover form …with its pertinent observations if there were any”



Apparently there were none, because as we said before, there are no cover sheets of the forms with observations referring to the “planas”. The observers, despite the directive, did not consider anomalous the filing out of the data on the part of those collecting the signatures. Or did they Dr. Rodríguez? If it was a mistake by the “observers”, can the CNE argue in its own decision its own errors and punish the citizens that were signing?


 


Even worse, the changes in the rules of the game were not participated by those most interest in it: those collecting the signatures. The directive was only for CNE employees. For the others there was no directive that would remind them about the supposed obligation of informing those signing that they had to fill the data themselves.

Was it simply carelessness? For those collecting the signatures, article 8, part B of the “Norms” of October 30th. establishes the following responsibility:


“Inform each elector that subscribes the form for collecting the signatures, about the data in the same and that is has manifested his/her will to sign and ask for the laminated ID card even if it has expired”.


As you can see, the signature collector was responsible only of informing the person signing about the data he/she had to provide (national ID number, First name, Last name and birthdate), but there was no indication that the person had to fill in such data in the form. Where the law or the regulations say nothing, the interpreter can not substitute his/her own particular opinion. Even more, the article talks about “The person that subscribes”, it means the “person that signs”, because that is precisely what the verb”to subscribe means.



It is evident that those that drafted the “Norms” had in their minds that what gives value and validity is the signature of those signing, not the mere data of his/her identity.


 


A failed act is what this is called by the psychiatry colleagues of Dr. Rodriguez.


 


On the other hand, Jorge Rodríguez said that the CNE could consider the possibility that a statistical sampling may be performed, but then “they should propose it”


 


Why doesn’t the CNE, of motu propio, appeal to this solution, which was suggested by the OAS and the Carter Center? Rodríguez extended himself on considerations about sample size and “admissible statistical error”, but went over the “little detail” that the CNE, if it wants to really search for solutions could design, without the need to hire a Noble Prize in Mathematics(??), the sampling that it considers ideal, with a margin of error that is compatible with the confidence in the procedure.

This should be the behavior of a body that tries to facilitate the exercise of a right of the citizens, not block it. The CNE has to rectify and society has the right to request it.

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