Archive for March 5th, 2004

The surreal revolution

March 5, 2004

 


There is a lot to blog about tonight, but I really need some rest before tomorrow’s march. Hopefully nothing will happen, but the attitude of the President, the Vice-President, the Minister of Defense, the Mayor of the Libertador District and the Fiscal (bundled Attorney general/Prosecutor) make me pessimistic.


 


The Government wants a confrontation and we want to protest to defend our rights. As usual we want it to be peaceful, as usual, the Government means to stop us. Why? I think the Chavez administration is looking for a crisis. Nothing else can explain everything that has happened during the last week. People have disappeared (10), have been killed (10), have been injured (more than 1300) and have been detained illegally, but the brutality can be proven by the fact that throughout all this, the ratio of injuries Opposition/Government is 150 to 1.


 


Mind you, I don’t want to keep count and I don’t want anyone, absolutely anyone, from either side, to be injured, but when you hear the Government justifying the brutality and the repression on the fact that National Guardsmen have been injured, I have to worry.


 


Last week, the Government did not want the opposition march to get close to the theater where the G-15 summit was taking place. They did not even allow a small group from the opposition to present a document to the leaders at the Summit. Hundreds of heavily armored National Guards with tanks were put in place and the tear gas began to fly even before the march got there.


 


This week, the opposition symbolically plans a march to the same place, there is no summit, all Mayors, including the Mayor of all of Caracas authorize the march, but the pro-Chavez mayor of the Libertador District says we can’t go there. Why? Coincidentally he is holding a market right at the same place, that nobody had heard about until the opposition said where it was going. This is what it is like to live in a totalitarian state. First we could not march to the presidential palace, later it was to the Electoral Council, now it is wherever we say we want to march, we can’t, just so a confrontation may take place.


 


Maybe the Government will be surprised tomorrow. See, there is a trap planned. Tomorrow we will behave badly, very badly. If we are attacked we have a plan, a really aggressive plan. We are going to sit down. If and when the National Guard starts throwing us tear gas canisters we, all of us, are simply going to sit down right there. The second part of the plan is even worse, more aggressive and Machiavellic, we plan to have international observers present. Foreigners at that! Some even from Bush’s country! Oh yeah, we are getting to be really bad people down here. We are learning.


 


We actually practiced today, in Chacao and in front of the OAS, and in Maracaibo and in Plaza La Meritocracia, where Jose Vilas’ mother challenged Hugo Chavez to meet with her. See, that is the ultimate battle plan. We all go out; we sit down, the whole country, at once. And we will be called all sorts of names.


 


Today was surreal. We had our “bundle” the Fiscal; imagine an Attorney General/Prosecutor, bundled into a single position. He is Chavez’ first Vice-President, later named to this hybrid position. While guaranteeing us impartiality, transparency and all those empty words he has said for the last two years, he actually justified the National Guard going outand repressing people by saying that the local authorities failed to maintain order. Hey! Pretty Good argument for the world press Isaias! Except the National Guard went out first! Remember? It was Thursday afternoon, Mugabe had not arrived yet and hundreds of prototypes of the “New Venezuelans” disguised as Robocops took the Avenida Libertador to stop us. Even before we were there they began throwing tear gas, injuring a reporter. By the time we got there, repression was all over. The tactics were those for a World War II tank battle, except Isaias, these were people armed with flags and posters. And more than half of them were women, not tanks. And Venezuelan women not only are good looking, but they are very tough, ask Elinor Montes. But your story is good Isais, Milosevic would love to have you as a roommate, and he will eventually. Imagine, you, Hugo, Milosevic and all three cheating Mugabe in the card game as he falls sleep!


 


And then there was Hugo himself. Inviting the Diplomatic Corp to explain to them how the opposition wants to overthrow him. After a sort of rerun of the Revolution will not be televised, lots of Carmona-the-Brief shots, he showed the aggressiveness of the opposition in last week’s march. Oh! The slingshots! The stones! The Women! So incredible aggressive, like that terrorist named Montes that walked up to the National Guard, flag in hand! Imagine she is a hero now! Terrorist! These women are really getting on my nerves and Garcia Carneiros’s. But he hates that Spanish reporter named Marta more.


 


Then, Chavez began to show how the media terrorizes. Video Clips of Mugabe falling sleep listening to Chavez’ speech! The TV announcer actually cracks up. What nerve! How irreverent! Except it was never clear whether the announcer was laughing at Mugabe or Chavez. Little difference in the end, you just wait. So far the imitation is uncanny!


 


Oh yes, in the interest of fairness, Chavez did show one yuppie with a .38, a pair of binoculars and a bullet proof vest. My God! This must be a coup in the making! What do your need a bulletproof vest for? We only use assault rifles! A bullet proof vest is useless against that! What fools! And more slingshots! That dangerous weapon that has been revived by the Venezuelan opposition and used to threaten the life of our citizens and loyal troops!.


 


See, said Chavez, it is George W. Bush (emphasis on the W) who has paid these thousands of people (no more than 2000,Jose Vicente told him) to do this. They want me to look bad; I have infiltrated the CIA and found they are giving Slingshot 100 and 101 courses! You want to know what the requirement is? You have to have signed in the Reafirmazo, except that the CIA does not accept the CNE data, it only accepts the Sumate data, otherwise they would have no students, their signatures would all be disqualified or under observation!


 


Then we saw the fraud by the opposition. Imagine, one person was dead, another was a foreigner. Cedula number 5070673, she is dead (but you try 8080 on your cellphone and she is pretty much alive) or 250083, he said this person does not exist, but it is in the Electoral Registry. Or some foreigners who signed, but their Cedulas were disqualified anyway, along with 143,000 others that were simply not in the registry. But Chavez talked to the psychiatrist Jorge Rodríguez who gave him some statistics classes, he can no longer be fooled, four cases make a gigantic fraud, no matter what Gaviria  and Jimmy the guy with the funny accent  in Spanish and his lackeys say.


 


Chavez told all of this with a nervous smile that made him look cynical and somewhat deranged, but that is only my personal and extremely biased judgment. As the Diplomats sat uncomfortably in the cheap plastic chairs with weak legs for four hours and they were all getting hungry (it was 4 PM) Hugo said: “We respect Human rights, but we will use force whenever necessary”. Only the word excessive was missing from the statement.


 


Chavez then called the CNE decision wise, the Church also took its blows “I have had more tolerance with them than with any Government, event his Sanctity” referring to the Pope. He threatened the media with closing them down (it’s coming, believe me).


 


He did not show pictures of anyone being shot in the back in cold blood, he did not mention the resignation of his UN Ambassador yesterday, he did not say that the Venezuelan Government has recused the Executive Secretary of the OAS Human rights Commission. You see, this is the pretty revolution; we do not talk about such things. They are simply necessary.

The surreal revolution

March 5, 2004

 


There is a lot to blog about tonight, but I really need some rest before tomorrow’s march. Hopefully nothing will happen, but the attitude of the President, the Vice-President, the Minister of Defense, the Mayor of the Libertador District and the Fiscal (bundled Attorney general/Prosecutor) make me pessimistic.


 


The Government wants a confrontation and we want to protest to defend our rights. As usual we want it to be peaceful, as usual, the Government means to stop us. Why? I think the Chavez administration is looking for a crisis. Nothing else can explain everything that has happened during the last week. People have disappeared (10), have been killed (10), have been injured (more than 1300) and have been detained illegally, but the brutality can be proven by the fact that throughout all this, the ratio of injuries Opposition/Government is 150 to 1.


 


Mind you, I don’t want to keep count and I don’t want anyone, absolutely anyone, from either side, to be injured, but when you hear the Government justifying the brutality and the repression on the fact that National Guardsmen have been injured, I have to worry.


 


Last week, the Government did not want the opposition march to get close to the theater where the G-15 summit was taking place. They did not even allow a small group from the opposition to present a document to the leaders at the Summit. Hundreds of heavily armored National Guards with tanks were put in place and the tear gas began to fly even before the march got there.


 


This week, the opposition symbolically plans a march to the same place, there is no summit, all Mayors, including the Mayor of all of Caracas authorize the march, but the pro-Chavez mayor of the Libertador District says we can’t go there. Why? Coincidentally he is holding a market right at the same place, that nobody had heard about until the opposition said where it was going. This is what it is like to live in a totalitarian state. First we could not march to the presidential palace, later it was to the Electoral Council, now it is wherever we say we want to march, we can’t, just so a confrontation may take place.


 


Maybe the Government will be surprised tomorrow. See, there is a trap planned. Tomorrow we will behave badly, very badly. If we are attacked we have a plan, a really aggressive plan. We are going to sit down. If and when the National Guard starts throwing us tear gas canisters we, all of us, are simply going to sit down right there. The second part of the plan is even worse, more aggressive and Machiavellic, we plan to have international observers present. Foreigners at that! Some even from Bush’s country! Oh yeah, we are getting to be really bad people down here. We are learning.


 


We actually practiced today, in Chacao and in front of the OAS, and in Maracaibo and in Plaza La Meritocracia, where Jose Vilas’ mother challenged Hugo Chavez to meet with her. See, that is the ultimate battle plan. We all go out; we sit down, the whole country, at once. And we will be called all sorts of names.


 


Today was surreal. We had our “bundle” the Fiscal; imagine an Attorney General/Prosecutor, bundled into a single position. He is Chavez’ first Vice-President, later named to this hybrid position. While guaranteeing us impartiality, transparency and all those empty words he has said for the last two years, he actually justified the National Guard going outand repressing people by saying that the local authorities failed to maintain order. Hey! Pretty Good argument for the world press Isaias! Except the National Guard went out first! Remember? It was Thursday afternoon, Mugabe had not arrived yet and hundreds of prototypes of the “New Venezuelans” disguised as Robocops took the Avenida Libertador to stop us. Even before we were there they began throwing tear gas, injuring a reporter. By the time we got there, repression was all over. The tactics were those for a World War II tank battle, except Isaias, these were people armed with flags and posters. And more than half of them were women, not tanks. And Venezuelan women not only are good looking, but they are very tough, ask Elinor Montes. But your story is good Isais, Milosevic would love to have you as a roommate, and he will eventually. Imagine, you, Hugo, Milosevic and all three cheating Mugabe in the card game as he falls sleep!


 


And then there was Hugo himself. Inviting the Diplomatic Corp to explain to them how the opposition wants to overthrow him. After a sort of rerun of the Revolution will not be televised, lots of Carmona-the-Brief shots, he showed the aggressiveness of the opposition in last week’s march. Oh! The slingshots! The stones! The Women! So incredible aggressive, like that terrorist named Montes that walked up to the National Guard, flag in hand! Imagine she is a hero now! Terrorist! These women are really getting on my nerves and Garcia Carneiros’s. But he hates that Spanish reporter named Marta more.


 


Then, Chavez began to show how the media terrorizes. Video Clips of Mugabe falling sleep listening to Chavez’ speech! The TV announcer actually cracks up. What nerve! How irreverent! Except it was never clear whether the announcer was laughing at Mugabe or Chavez. Little difference in the end, you just wait. So far the imitation is uncanny!


 


Oh yes, in the interest of fairness, Chavez did show one yuppie with a .38, a pair of binoculars and a bullet proof vest. My God! This must be a coup in the making! What do your need a bulletproof vest for? We only use assault rifles! A bullet proof vest is useless against that! What fools! And more slingshots! That dangerous weapon that has been revived by the Venezuelan opposition and used to threaten the life of our citizens and loyal troops!.


 


See, said Chavez, it is George W. Bush (emphasis on the W) who has paid these thousands of people (no more than 2000,Jose Vicente told him) to do this. They want me to look bad; I have infiltrated the CIA and found they are giving Slingshot 100 and 101 courses! You want to know what the requirement is? You have to have signed in the Reafirmazo, except that the CIA does not accept the CNE data, it only accepts the Sumate data, otherwise they would have no students, their signatures would all be disqualified or under observation!


 


Then we saw the fraud by the opposition. Imagine, one person was dead, another was a foreigner. Cedula number 5070673, she is dead (but you try 8080 on your cellphone and she is pretty much alive) or 250083, he said this person does not exist, but it is in the Electoral Registry. Or some foreigners who signed, but their Cedulas were disqualified anyway, along with 143,000 others that were simply not in the registry. But Chavez talked to the psychiatrist Jorge Rodríguez who gave him some statistics classes, he can no longer be fooled, four cases make a gigantic fraud, no matter what Gaviria  and Jimmy the guy with the funny accent  in Spanish and his lackeys say.


 


Chavez told all of this with a nervous smile that made him look cynical and somewhat deranged, but that is only my personal and extremely biased judgment. As the Diplomats sat uncomfortably in the cheap plastic chairs with weak legs for four hours and they were all getting hungry (it was 4 PM) Hugo said: “We respect Human rights, but we will use force whenever necessary”. Only the word excessive was missing from the statement.


 


Chavez then called the CNE decision wise, the Church also took its blows “I have had more tolerance with them than with any Government, event his Sanctity” referring to the Pope. He threatened the media with closing them down (it’s coming, believe me).


 


He did not show pictures of anyone being shot in the back in cold blood, he did not mention the resignation of his UN Ambassador yesterday, he did not say that the Venezuelan Government has recused the Executive Secretary of the OAS Human rights Commission. You see, this is the pretty revolution; we do not talk about such things. They are simply necessary.

Venezuelan crisis getting visible

March 5, 2004

Lots of articles about Venezuela today in the National Review, WSJ, Washington Post and a press release from Barney Frank who two years ago was a Chavez defender:


 From the Wall Street Journal:


Time Is Running Out
To Rescue Venezuela


By MARY ANASTASIA O’GRADY


During the Chilean presidency of socialist Salvador Allende in the early 1970s, Cuba and the Soviet Union both lusted for control of that frail South American democracy. Yet between Moscow and Havana, there were serious differences about the best way to realize the dream. Cuba favored violent revolution while the Soviets believed in a slower, ideological conversion. In a 2000 interview in Santiago, two Moscow-educated researchers studying Soviet archives described to me the U.S.S.R.’s Chile strategy of “working to plan, organize and build a structure for the whole country.”


Fidel won the argument but his plan sowed chaos, prompting the 1973 Pinochet coup, whereby Chile escaped Castro’s clutches. Had the Soviets employed their gradual subversion skills, things might have turned out differently. Nobody, it seems, understands that better than Castro. Proof of how much he learned is now on display in Venezuela.


Since winning a presidential election in 1998, Castro’s Venezuelan protege, President Hugo Chavez, has pursued precisely what the Russian researchers in Santiago described: the methodical consolidation of absolute authority under the guise of “democracy.” Along with paramilitaries and community snoopers, the Chavez power grab has entailed converting the congress into a unicameral body, rewriting the constitution to enhance his rule and purging potential opponents in the military.


Having “legally” completed these initial steps to consolidate his power, Mr. Chavez then militarized the government, packed the Supreme Court, imported a large number of Cubans to indoctrinate the citizenry and began choking off the private sector with capital and price controls. The Catholic Church and the media remain largely outside his grasp but regularly are targets of state intimidation tactics. Virulent Chavez rhetoric polarizes society, inflames hatred and puts the safety of independent thinkers at risk.


Developments this week demonstrate that this crazed “Bolivarian revolutionary,” as he sees himself, is now in the final phases of his consolidation. The noose is already so tight around the neck of what is left of the democracy that it may not be able to escape. Short of some improbable rebellion by the largely unarmed opposition, Venezuelan free society will be swinging from the gallows by the time Mr. Chavez’s useful idiots in the U.S. Congress and the Organization of American States figure out that he is no democrat.


The opposition has tried hard to abide by the rules of Mr. Chavez’s “democracy.” The latest chapter is the popular effort to win a recall referendum, a mechanism Mr. Chavez himself put into his constitution so that a dissatisfied electorate would not resort to a military coup as he did in 1992.


In order to hold the referendum, the opposition had to collect a minimum of 2.4 million signatures. Its leaders maintain that over 3.4 million Venezuelans have signed that petition. But shortly after the petition drive ended, Mr. Chavez proclaimed that the process was riddled with fraud. On Tuesday, the electoral council (CNE), which by a margin of 3-2 is pro-Chavez, ruled that only 1.8 million signatures could be certified. The ruling says that 1.1 million signatures might be valid but must be verified by the signers. The CNE threw out over half a million names.


International observers see this as a stalling technique that further lowers the chances that a referendum will ever materialize. Goldman Sachs analyst Alberto Ramos summed up the skepticism in a March 3 report: “The odds that there will be a presidential recall referendum dropped to 20%, given the sheer number of appeals that have to be lodged and the many venues at the disposal of the government to abort the process.”


The appeals process delays the vote that Venezuelans are clearly entitled to under constitutional law. But it also exponentially increases the potential for bureaucratic impediments. There are legitimate fears about the state’s power to intimidate petitioners who are called in to verify their signatures. In a country where so many are employed by the government, threat of job loss alone is a powerful tool.


Add to this the typical Third World complexities for petitioners who might have trouble learning that their signatures have been challenged or have problems physically reaching the official locations for appeal. Consider too that the labor-intensive process will be difficult to monitor. As master of the state’s resources, Mr. Chavez certainly has the upper hand.


What all of this suggests is that if the international community advises the opposition to go along with the appeals process, it must also ensure its fairness. Failure to do so is equivalent to handing Mr. Chavez the pistol he will use to finish off the last vestiges of Venezuelan democracy.


What’s at stake is more than the enslavement of Venezuela. Mr. Chavez’s model, if successful, will be fashioned into a template for the rest of Latin America. Without a clear message from the international community that it will not tolerate the militarization of democracy, the Chavez virus could infect other Latin nations.


Bolivia is already at risk. I’m told that at one time, Mr. Chavez’s military attache in Bolivia was holding meetings with police and military officers and providing funds to radical, militant groups. The supposedly spontaneous uprising by the Indian population that brought down the government of President Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada in October 2003 was, more accurately, an organized coup d’etat. Some 5,000 agitators were bussed about the country for six weeks to set up ambushes and block roads. People close to the events say Mr. Chavez provided the money while Castro provided the organization.


Despite all the claims to “legality,” Venezuelans know well what is happening to their country. That’s why they have been committing brave acts of civil disobedience at the risk of losing their lives. Last week an unarmed protestor was allegedly shot in the back by the military. Yesterday the country’s ambassador to the U.N. stepped down citing his government’s disrespect for human rights. It is well past time for the Free World to make an equally forceful protest against Commandante Chavez.


Also check out the Washington Post Editorial “Coup by Technicality” A highlight:


Yet, after delaying its response for weeks, the commission, dominated by Mr. Chavez’s supporters, rejected 1.6 million of them, or nearly half the total. To do so, it invented requirements that didn’t previously exist. Most notably, it threw out 876,000 signatures, each accompanied by a thumbprint, because someone other than the voter had entered registration details on the petition.


If Mr. Chavez continues to deny his people a democratic vote, leaders from those nations must be prepared to invoke the Democracy Charter of the OAS and threaten him with the isolation reserved for autocrats.


Venezuela Erupting in the National Review. Highlight:


Instead of waiting for shoes to drop, those interested in saving Venezuela’s shrinking democratic space should stand on principle. The OAS and the Carter Center should condemn Venezuela’s electoral council for changing the rules after the signatures were collected.


Human Rights Watch:


There have been reports of at least nine protesters killed and dozens of people injured—including several journalists—during confrontations with the National Guard over the past week. Under international standards, the intentional use of lethal force by law enforcement officials is permissible only when strictly unavoidable to protect life.  


US Congressman Barney Frank:


“I am very disappointed at the Venezuelan National Electoral Council’s use of hyper-technical points and controversial procedural rulings to repress what appears to be the clear will of a sufficient number of Venezuelan citizens to move the country to a constitutional referendum on President Chavez”

ISHR and the Sajarov Foundation Communique

March 5, 2004

Last night, I translated part of the Communique by the International Society for Human Rights and the Sajarov Foundation. It was so trong that I only put part of it. Today, I called Germany and verified the origin of the text and its authors. here is the complete text and its writers:


Communiqué of the International Society for Human Rights and the Andrei Sakharov Foundation


 


In the face of the recent wave of crimes against the Venezuelan civilian population, which is claiming for respect for democratic institutionality, perpetrated by the new candidate for totalitarian strongman, Hugo Chávez, our Human Rights Organizations express their firm condemnation and make a public call to the international public opinion so that it reacts in categorical fashion this step back into barbarie which, under the direct influence of the Stalinists directives captained by Fidel Castro from Havana, threatens to subject the whole of Venezuelan society to debacle and tyrannical submission.


 


The subterfuges and false arguments that “Chavism” is employing in Venezuela are the same that have been used by other despots that ended up exterminating millions of human beings with the only real goal of perpetuating themselves in power and of creating dynasties of executioners. V. Lenin, Adolph Hitler, Mao Tse Tung, Benito Mussolini and Fidel Castro among other representatives of twentieth century repression have established the formulas for squashing all vestiges of democratic rights and civil liberties.


 


A new wave of fascist and Stalinist national socialism is going around in Latin America, with Hugo Chavez and Fidel Castro playing the role of Commissars in Chief, the same way it went around Europe for decades last century. Those that fight for the integral respect for human rights, anywhere in the planet, can not remain impassive facing this new cycle which returns us to medieval servility.


 


Vitautas Landsbergis, President of IGFM, ex President of Lithuania.


Alexander Soljenitzyn, ex prisoner of the Gulag y Nobel Prize in Literature


Lech Walesa, ex president of Poland


Janos Kiss, ex President of the Hungarian Parliament


Václav Havel, ex President of the Check Republic


Serguei Agrusow, Founder of IGFM, Germany


Elena Bonner, President of the Andrei Sajarov Foundation.


Elie Wiezel, Nobel Peace Prize


Haydée Marín, President of the Panamerican Comitte of IGFM


Miroslav Kusy, Memmber of the Parlamient of the Republic of Slovakia


Anton Manolescu, President of the Human Rights Comisión of the Romanian Parliament


Sergel Grigorianc, Helsinki Group of Moscow


Adam Michnik, Polish Intellectual and Reporter.


Ricardo Bofill, President of the Committee for Human Rights of Cuba.


Lee Van Thau, Executive Director of the Human Rights Coordinator of Vietnam.


Sergej Kovaljov, Russian Movement for Human Rights.


 


Berlin, March 4, 2004

ISHR and the Sajarov Foundation Communique

March 5, 2004

Last night, I translated part of the Communique by the International Society for Human Rights and the Sajarov Foundation. It was so trong that I only put part of it. Today, I called Germany and verified the origin of the text and its authors. here is the complete text and its writers:


Communiqué of the International Society for Human Rights and the Andrei Sakharov Foundation


 


In the face of the recent wave of crimes against the Venezuelan civilian population, which is claiming for respect for democratic institutionality, perpetrated by the new candidate for totalitarian strongman, Hugo Chávez, our Human Rights Organizations express their firm condemnation and make a public call to the international public opinion so that it reacts in categorical fashion this step back into barbarie which, under the direct influence of the Stalinists directives captained by Fidel Castro from Havana, threatens to subject the whole of Venezuelan society to debacle and tyrannical submission.


 


The subterfuges and false arguments that “Chavism” is employing in Venezuela are the same that have been used by other despots that ended up exterminating millions of human beings with the only real goal of perpetuating themselves in power and of creating dynasties of executioners. V. Lenin, Adolph Hitler, Mao Tse Tung, Benito Mussolini and Fidel Castro among other representatives of twentieth century repression have established the formulas for squashing all vestiges of democratic rights and civil liberties.


 


A new wave of fascist and Stalinist national socialism is going around in Latin America, with Hugo Chavez and Fidel Castro playing the role of Commissars in Chief, the same way it went around Europe for decades last century. Those that fight for the integral respect for human rights, anywhere in the planet, can not remain impassive facing this new cycle which returns us to medieval servility.


 


Vitautas Landsbergis, President of IGFM, ex President of Lithuania.


Alexander Soljenitzyn, ex prisoner of the Gulag y Nobel Prize in Literature


Lech Walesa, ex president of Poland


Janos Kiss, ex President of the Hungarian Parliament


Václav Havel, ex President of the Check Republic


Serguei Agrusow, Founder of IGFM, Germany


Elena Bonner, President of the Andrei Sajarov Foundation.


Elie Wiezel, Nobel Peace Prize


Haydée Marín, President of the Panamerican Comitte of IGFM


Miroslav Kusy, Memmber of the Parlamient of the Republic of Slovakia


Anton Manolescu, President of the Human Rights Comisión of the Romanian Parliament


Sergel Grigorianc, Helsinki Group of Moscow


Adam Michnik, Polish Intellectual and Reporter.


Ricardo Bofill, President of the Committee for Human Rights of Cuba.


Lee Van Thau, Executive Director of the Human Rights Coordinator of Vietnam.


Sergej Kovaljov, Russian Movement for Human Rights.


 


Berlin, March 4, 2004

March 5, 2004

 


 



Reuters translated Pendejo as asshole last week, it’s more like dumbell. Here is this cartoon from Panama sent in by Manuel, where Chavez is shown calling Bush pendejo, then Bush asks Pendej? and then asks his father where he knows the word from, with the elder Bush responding Noriega 1989.

March 5, 2004

 


 



Reuters translated Pendejo as asshole last week, it’s more like dumbell. Here is this cartoon from Panama sent in by Manuel, where Chavez is shown calling Bush pendejo, then Bush asks Pendej? and then asks his father where he knows the word from, with the elder Bush responding Noriega 1989.

March 5, 2004

 


 



Reuters translated Pendejo as asshole last week, it’s more like dumbell. Here is this cartoon from Panama sent in by Manuel, where Chavez is shown calling Bush pendejo, then Bush asks Pendej? and then asks his father where he knows the word from, with the elder Bush responding Noriega 1989.

March 5, 2004

 


 



Reuters translated Pendejo as asshole last week, it’s more like dumbell. Here is this cartoon from Panama sent in by Manuel, where Chavez is shown calling Bush pendejo, then Bush asks Pendej? and then asks his father where he knows the word from, with the elder Bush responding Noriega 1989.

Rational and controlled repression

March 5, 2004

Vice-President Jose Vicente Rangel: ‘ The action of the public forces has been absolutely rational and controlled”


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 11,832 other followers