Archive for February 15th, 2005

Three new promises from our illustrious leadership

February 15, 2005

-President Hugo Chavez announced yesterday the creation of a committee to prevent and manage the follow up to disasters, which will become a permanent committee and will be presided by the Minister of the Interior and Justice Jesse Chacon.


My take: I wonder if its members will be the same as those that were supposed to come up in forty days with a plan to end poverty. By the way, it has been fifty four days and we have yet to hear from them. In fact, it i fifteen days overdue!


 


-And then there is the member of the Board of PDVSA who said today that in March the company will present its audited financial statements for 2003 and those from 2004 will be turned in July of this year.


 


My take: I remember the same thing being said in March of last year, that they would be handed in June. Then in June they said September, then in August they repurchased US$ 2.5 billion of PDVSA’s debt to save the asses of PDVSA’s Board for their failure to file under US laws. Should we believe them his time. Nah!


 


-And our esteemed President announced that the Government will “order” reducing the concentration of people in Vargas state. Chavez said that in 1999 they tried to do this, but they could not. This time, said Chavez “we can’t fail, at whatever cost”


 


My take: Another brilliant strategy, take people who live in a state with jobs and failing infrastructure and take them to another state with no jobs and no infrastructure. What do you think will happen? They will come back the same way that they came back to Vargas after the 1999 tragedy. Vargas is a state with the conditions to develop a spectacular tourist industry with thousands of jobs. The problem is that you need good management to fix the current infrastructure and then develop the new one. Too scary a thought for an incompetent Government!

The corruption in Vargas in plain numbers

February 15, 2005

 



Today Tal Cual published the above table with the funds approved for the reconstruction of Vargas state. These are Bolivars at the exchange rate at the time. The first line is the US$ 1 billion assigned by the National Assembly (ANC), then there is the international funds at the same exchange rate of Bs. 697 per US$. The rest are smaller amounts for expropriations, building housing, the famous “sobremarcha” to reactivate the economy in 2002 and special assignments to Vargas in 2002 and 2003.


 


These numbers are very similar to those given out today by Deputy Pedro Castillo in today’s El Universal. According to Castillo these were the funds:


 


-US$ 1billion or Bs. 697 billion approved by the Constituent Assembly and published in the Official Gazette of February 2nd. 2000. The first President of Corpovargas said in August 2000 that the reconstruction would take three years and it would cost Bs. 650 billion.


 


-International aid, which in a newspaper insert on December 15th. 2000, the Government said amounted to US$ 656 million.


 


-Funds from the “Sobremarcha” project, which the Government said amounted to Bs. 80 billion.


 


-Bs. 20 billion from the Venezuelan Investment Fund (Fondo de Inversiones de Venezuela)


 


According to Castillo most of these funds ended up being used to repurchasing public debt bonds, using the arguments that the capital would increase. “We all know such operations are only good so that you receive a spread under the table and somebody make a bunch of ill obtained gains”, says Castillo adding: “ They invested part of the funds in building the “Vargas Solidarity” suburb in front of the airport, where half or more of the apartments were assigned to members of the military, the Mayor of Vargas and even councilman Carlos Herrera pointed out that the President of the Urban Development Fund gave (murdered) Prosecutor Danilo Anderson two apartments which he later sold.


 


This my friends is the blatant corruption of the pretty revolution! Of course, it is easier to blame Bush, the strike, the coup or whatever than face reality.

To Omar Mora , on Valentine’s day by Claudio Nazoa

February 15, 2005

And a little bit of humor is needed by now, courtesy of humorist Claudio o Nazoa in today’s El Nacional, dedicated to the new President of the Supreme Court. It is humor, but there are also a lot of serious thoughts in it


To Omar Mora , on Valentine’s day


 


Dear Omar:


 


Do not misinterpret me because write this letter today, February 14th. What happens is that these days I have had you very much in my mind. I always remember you with a lot of affection, missing our close youth full of friendship, family, studies, remembering our dear Casalta of Catia, our shared political fights, in summary, we lived so many adventures that it would be long to enumerate them, but nevertheless, I would like to express that even the bad things that happened to us, I remember with a lot of affection.


 


I imagine that you are by now ready for what comes after so much love, but don’t worry Mora, keep reading, that from my pen there will be more words of esteem. I only want to remember things from our interesting past together, when we were outright buddies.


 


You were, and I tell everyone that, the best student I have ever known, sometimes you even studied for the lazy ones like me that would copy tests from you on the subjects that I did not like.


 


You were one of the few leaders of the student movement that I knew that would throw rocks and would always get an A up to the point of graduating Summa Cum Laude from UCV.


 


How many rocks we threw together at the April 19th. High school in Catia! We protested everything and we never remained silenced by anything that we considered unjust.


 


We were lucky enough to have extraordinary teachers such as Professor Digna de Rivas, Professor Simon Escalona and others, of whom I don’t remember the names but they did teach me a lot, which is what is important.


 


How much we enjoyed studying and political fights!


 


Our graduating class was named after Simon Bolivar and my father, Aquiles Nazoa, was its godfather. We believed in a pretty Bolivar, tolerant, a gentleman, brave, elegant, fine. Liberator of nations, incapable of insulting a lady, even if she was the Queen of Spain.


 


Omar, do you remember those meetings we held with my father in Casalta? Do you remember how many times he went to the high school and gave us talks on Bolivar. We fought against all of the Governments which we lived through, even against the last one of Caldera, who barely said anything and had Chavez in jail.


 


We were happy and we were not aware of it.


 


We had so many projects, and note that most of those that graduated with us fulfilled them.


 


I thought that one day I would be President of the Supreme Court and you, a comedian…It’s a joke. The truth is that we both have different professions, the goal of which should be the same, to make people happy, you with your laws and me with my jokes.


 


Jesus, Omar, here comes the bad part…How do I say it? Ahhh, well! There it goes!


 


Mora, sometimes life is strange. It is now you who are that gentleman that we used to protest against when we were beautiful and dreamers. I am still throwing rocks at the same Government that we used to throw at when we were young, but now my rocks are my writings and I swear that the motives are the same we shared one day.


 


Omar, look around you; this is not what we endangered our lives for. It is not possible that you think the military that used to hit us with their machetes when we protested are now wonderful.


 


We fought and dreamt together of a country filled with happy kids, full of Aquiles Nazoa, full of brilliant students like you, of Indians that would not beg in the streets of the right to sign and say without fear ”I don’ like the President”. We dreamt of a country filled with dignified military officers, that would not burp in the face of women.


 


Omar, I learned that revolutions begin with being at peace with individual forms, without hate, with ourselves, so that from there we can irradiate concrete deeds for collective well being.


 


I liked it a lot that you said that we had to make all of us equals from the top and not from the bottom.


 


You and I fought for pretty causes and felt anger for the injustices we saw surrounding us, but I do not remember that in our hearts we had sentiments of hate, nor rancor.


 


I invite you to accompany me in throwing rocks again and for that I remind you of a phrase by Che Guevara:” If you are capable of outrage every time an injustice is made in the world, then we are brothers”. And I believe Omar that two things are happening: there is a lot of injustice and it is now in your hand that this does not continue to happen. Amazing! No?


 


The problem, Omar, is the “revolution”.


 


Revolutions are like marriages: wonderful as long as you are not the one getting married. “The revolution” here is wonderful as it is enjoyed by intellectual Ignacio Ramonet, who I assure you would never suffer this shit in France, neither Chavez nor Fidel.


 


I am sure that if things continue being the way they are going, I am going straight to jail. I bother you to request from you only one thing, please, send me to a jail where inmates will not rape me and tell the guards to allow my mom to bring me food.


 


Loves you like Hell, your forever friend.


 


P.S. Just in case I am not a coupster, nor do I belong to the CIA…but I wish I was.

To Omar Mora , on Valentine’s day by Claudio Nazoa

February 15, 2005

And a little bit of humor is needed by now, courtesy of humorist Claudio o Nazoa in today’s El Nacional, dedicated to the new President of the Supreme Court. It is humor, but there are also a lot of serious thoughts in it


To Omar Mora , on Valentine’s day


 


Dear Omar:


 


Do not misinterpret me because write this letter today, February 14th. What happens is that these days I have had you very much in my mind. I always remember you with a lot of affection, missing our close youth full of friendship, family, studies, remembering our dear Casalta of Catia, our shared political fights, in summary, we lived so many adventures that it would be long to enumerate them, but nevertheless, I would like to express that even the bad things that happened to us, I remember with a lot of affection.


 


I imagine that you are by now ready for what comes after so much love, but don’t worry Mora, keep reading, that from my pen there will be more words of esteem. I only want to remember things from our interesting past together, when we were outright buddies.


 


You were, and I tell everyone that, the best student I have ever known, sometimes you even studied for the lazy ones like me that would copy tests from you on the subjects that I did not like.


 


You were one of the few leaders of the student movement that I knew that would throw rocks and would always get an A up to the point of graduating Summa Cum Laude from UCV.


 


How many rocks we threw together at the April 19th. High school in Catia! We protested everything and we never remained silenced by anything that we considered unjust.


 


We were lucky enough to have extraordinary teachers such as Professor Digna de Rivas, Professor Simon Escalona and others, of whom I don’t remember the names but they did teach me a lot, which is what is important.


 


How much we enjoyed studying and political fights!


 


Our graduating class was named after Simon Bolivar and my father, Aquiles Nazoa, was its godfather. We believed in a pretty Bolivar, tolerant, a gentleman, brave, elegant, fine. Liberator of nations, incapable of insulting a lady, even if she was the Queen of Spain.


 


Omar, do you remember those meetings we held with my father in Casalta? Do you remember how many times he went to the high school and gave us talks on Bolivar. We fought against all of the Governments which we lived through, even against the last one of Caldera, who barely said anything and had Chavez in jail.


 


We were happy and we were not aware of it.


 


We had so many projects, and note that most of those that graduated with us fulfilled them.


 


I thought that one day I would be President of the Supreme Court and you, a comedian…It’s a joke. The truth is that we both have different professions, the goal of which should be the same, to make people happy, you with your laws and me with my jokes.


 


Jesus, Omar, here comes the bad part…How do I say it? Ahhh, well! There it goes!


 


Mora, sometimes life is strange. It is now you who are that gentleman that we used to protest against when we were beautiful and dreamers. I am still throwing rocks at the same Government that we used to throw at when we were young, but now my rocks are my writings and I swear that the motives are the same we shared one day.


 


Omar, look around you; this is not what we endangered our lives for. It is not possible that you think the military that used to hit us with their machetes when we protested are now wonderful.


 


We fought and dreamt together of a country filled with happy kids, full of Aquiles Nazoa, full of brilliant students like you, of Indians that would not beg in the streets of the right to sign and say without fear ”I don’ like the President”. We dreamt of a country filled with dignified military officers, that would not burp in the face of women.


 


Omar, I learned that revolutions begin with being at peace with individual forms, without hate, with ourselves, so that from there we can irradiate concrete deeds for collective well being.


 


I liked it a lot that you said that we had to make all of us equals from the top and not from the bottom.


 


You and I fought for pretty causes and felt anger for the injustices we saw surrounding us, but I do not remember that in our hearts we had sentiments of hate, nor rancor.


 


I invite you to accompany me in throwing rocks again and for that I remind you of a phrase by Che Guevara:” If you are capable of outrage every time an injustice is made in the world, then we are brothers”. And I believe Omar that two things are happening: there is a lot of injustice and it is now in your hand that this does not continue to happen. Amazing! No?


 


The problem, Omar, is the “revolution”.


 


Revolutions are like marriages: wonderful as long as you are not the one getting married. “The revolution” here is wonderful as it is enjoyed by intellectual Ignacio Ramonet, who I assure you would never suffer this shit in France, neither Chavez nor Fidel.


 


I am sure that if things continue being the way they are going, I am going straight to jail. I bother you to request from you only one thing, please, send me to a jail where inmates will not rape me and tell the guards to allow my mom to bring me food.


 


Loves you like Hell, your forever friend.


 


P.S. Just in case I am not a coupster, nor do I belong to the CIA…but I wish I was.

To Omar Mora , on Valentine’s day by Claudio Nazoa

February 15, 2005

And a little bit of humor is needed by now, courtesy of humorist Claudio o Nazoa in today’s El Nacional, dedicated to the new President of the Supreme Court. It is humor, but there are also a lot of serious thoughts in it


To Omar Mora , on Valentine’s day


 


Dear Omar:


 


Do not misinterpret me because write this letter today, February 14th. What happens is that these days I have had you very much in my mind. I always remember you with a lot of affection, missing our close youth full of friendship, family, studies, remembering our dear Casalta of Catia, our shared political fights, in summary, we lived so many adventures that it would be long to enumerate them, but nevertheless, I would like to express that even the bad things that happened to us, I remember with a lot of affection.


 


I imagine that you are by now ready for what comes after so much love, but don’t worry Mora, keep reading, that from my pen there will be more words of esteem. I only want to remember things from our interesting past together, when we were outright buddies.


 


You were, and I tell everyone that, the best student I have ever known, sometimes you even studied for the lazy ones like me that would copy tests from you on the subjects that I did not like.


 


You were one of the few leaders of the student movement that I knew that would throw rocks and would always get an A up to the point of graduating Summa Cum Laude from UCV.


 


How many rocks we threw together at the April 19th. High school in Catia! We protested everything and we never remained silenced by anything that we considered unjust.


 


We were lucky enough to have extraordinary teachers such as Professor Digna de Rivas, Professor Simon Escalona and others, of whom I don’t remember the names but they did teach me a lot, which is what is important.


 


How much we enjoyed studying and political fights!


 


Our graduating class was named after Simon Bolivar and my father, Aquiles Nazoa, was its godfather. We believed in a pretty Bolivar, tolerant, a gentleman, brave, elegant, fine. Liberator of nations, incapable of insulting a lady, even if she was the Queen of Spain.


 


Omar, do you remember those meetings we held with my father in Casalta? Do you remember how many times he went to the high school and gave us talks on Bolivar. We fought against all of the Governments which we lived through, even against the last one of Caldera, who barely said anything and had Chavez in jail.


 


We were happy and we were not aware of it.


 


We had so many projects, and note that most of those that graduated with us fulfilled them.


 


I thought that one day I would be President of the Supreme Court and you, a comedian…It’s a joke. The truth is that we both have different professions, the goal of which should be the same, to make people happy, you with your laws and me with my jokes.


 


Jesus, Omar, here comes the bad part…How do I say it? Ahhh, well! There it goes!


 


Mora, sometimes life is strange. It is now you who are that gentleman that we used to protest against when we were beautiful and dreamers. I am still throwing rocks at the same Government that we used to throw at when we were young, but now my rocks are my writings and I swear that the motives are the same we shared one day.


 


Omar, look around you; this is not what we endangered our lives for. It is not possible that you think the military that used to hit us with their machetes when we protested are now wonderful.


 


We fought and dreamt together of a country filled with happy kids, full of Aquiles Nazoa, full of brilliant students like you, of Indians that would not beg in the streets of the right to sign and say without fear ”I don’ like the President”. We dreamt of a country filled with dignified military officers, that would not burp in the face of women.


 


Omar, I learned that revolutions begin with being at peace with individual forms, without hate, with ourselves, so that from there we can irradiate concrete deeds for collective well being.


 


I liked it a lot that you said that we had to make all of us equals from the top and not from the bottom.


 


You and I fought for pretty causes and felt anger for the injustices we saw surrounding us, but I do not remember that in our hearts we had sentiments of hate, nor rancor.


 


I invite you to accompany me in throwing rocks again and for that I remind you of a phrase by Che Guevara:” If you are capable of outrage every time an injustice is made in the world, then we are brothers”. And I believe Omar that two things are happening: there is a lot of injustice and it is now in your hand that this does not continue to happen. Amazing! No?


 


The problem, Omar, is the “revolution”.


 


Revolutions are like marriages: wonderful as long as you are not the one getting married. “The revolution” here is wonderful as it is enjoyed by intellectual Ignacio Ramonet, who I assure you would never suffer this shit in France, neither Chavez nor Fidel.


 


I am sure that if things continue being the way they are going, I am going straight to jail. I bother you to request from you only one thing, please, send me to a jail where inmates will not rape me and tell the guards to allow my mom to bring me food.


 


Loves you like Hell, your forever friend.


 


P.S. Just in case I am not a coupster, nor do I belong to the CIA…but I would love to be both.

To Omar Mora , on Valentine’s day by Claudio Nazoa

February 15, 2005

And a little bit of humor is needed by now, courtesy of humorist Claudio o Nazoa in today’s El Nacional, dedicated to the new President of the Supreme Court. It is humor, but there are also a lot of serious thoughts in it


To Omar Mora , on Valentine’s day


 


Dear Omar:


 


Do not misinterpret me because write this letter today, February 14th. What happens is that these days I have had you very much in my mind. I always remember you with a lot of affection, missing our close youth full of friendship, family, studies, remembering our dear Casalta of Catia, our shared political fights, in summary, we lived so many adventures that it would be long to enumerate them, but nevertheless, I would like to express that even the bad things that happened to us, I remember with a lot of affection.


 


I imagine that you are by now ready for what comes after so much love, but don’t worry Mora, keep reading, that from my pen there will be more words of esteem. I only want to remember things from our interesting past together, when we were outright buddies.


 


You were, and I tell everyone that, the best student I have ever known, sometimes you even studied for the lazy ones like me that would copy tests from you on the subjects that I did not like.


 


You were one of the few leaders of the student movement that I knew that would throw rocks and would always get an A up to the point of graduating Summa Cum Laude from UCV.


 


How many rocks we threw together at the April 19th. High school in Catia! We protested everything and we never remained silenced by anything that we considered unjust.


 


We were lucky enough to have extraordinary teachers such as Professor Digna de Rivas, Professor Simon Escalona and others, of whom I don’t remember the names but they did teach me a lot, which is what is important.


 


How much we enjoyed studying and political fights!


 


Our graduating class was named after Simon Bolivar and my father, Aquiles Nazoa, was its godfather. We believed in a pretty Bolivar, tolerant, a gentleman, brave, elegant, fine. Liberator of nations, incapable of insulting a lady, even if she was the Queen of Spain.


 


Omar, do you remember those meetings we held with my father in Casalta? Do you remember how many times he went to the high school and gave us talks on Bolivar. We fought against all of the Governments which we lived through, even against the last one of Caldera, who barely said anything and had Chavez in jail.


 


We were happy and we were not aware of it.


 


We had so many projects, and note that most of those that graduated with us fulfilled them.


 


I thought that one day I would be President of the Supreme Court and you, a comedian…It’s a joke. The truth is that we both have different professions, the goal of which should be the same, to make people happy, you with your laws and me with my jokes.


 


Jesus, Omar, here comes the bad part…How do I say it? Ahhh, well! There it goes!


 


Mora, sometimes life is strange. It is now you who are that gentleman that we used to protest against when we were beautiful and dreamers. I am still throwing rocks at the same Government that we used to throw at when we were young, but now my rocks are my writings and I swear that the motives are the same we shared one day.


 


Omar, look around you; this is not what we endangered our lives for. It is not possible that you think the military that used to hit us with their machetes when we protested are now wonderful.


 


We fought and dreamt together of a country filled with happy kids, full of Aquiles Nazoa, full of brilliant students like you, of Indians that would not beg in the streets of the right to sign and say without fear ”I don’ like the President”. We dreamt of a country filled with dignified military officers, that would not burp in the face of women.


 


Omar, I learned that revolutions begin with being at peace with individual forms, without hate, with ourselves, so that from there we can irradiate concrete deeds for collective well being.


 


I liked it a lot that you said that we had to make all of us equals from the top and not from the bottom.


 


You and I fought for pretty causes and felt anger for the injustices we saw surrounding us, but I do not remember that in our hearts we had sentiments of hate, nor rancor.


 


I invite you to accompany me in throwing rocks again and for that I remind you of a phrase by Che Guevara:” If you are capable of outrage every time an injustice is made in the world, then we are brothers”. And I believe Omar that two things are happening: there is a lot of injustice and it is now in your hand that this does not continue to happen. Amazing! No?


 


The problem, Omar, is the “revolution”.


 


Revolutions are like marriages: wonderful as long as you are not the one getting married. “The revolution” here is wonderful as it is enjoyed by intellectual Ignacio Ramonet, who I assure you would never suffer this shit in France, neither Chavez nor Fidel.


 


I am sure that if things continue being the way they are going, I am going straight to jail. I bother you to request from you only one thing, please, send me to a jail where inmates will not rape me and tell the guards to allow my mom to bring me food.


 


Loves you like Hell, your forever friend.


 


P.S. Just in case I am not a coupster, nor do I belong to the CIA…but I would love to be both.

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