Venezuela breaks relations with Colombia (Again)

July 22, 2010

Standing next to Diego Marandona, the Argentinean futbol star and coach, President Hugo Chavez broke relations today with Colombia, arguing it was a matter of “dignity”, without referring to the dignity of the company in which he was making the announcement, a totally frivolous and unnecessary event. He has done it before and threatened it many times. In fact, last time, Chavez even threatened to nationalize Colombian companies and the previous time he ordered troops mobilized to the border with Colombia. I am sure he will set up some form of show this time around, telling us how Colombia wants to attack us. Curiously, not a single reply by Venezuela’s Ambassador to the OAS as to the truth of some 87 guerrilla bases that the Colombian Government says are within the borders of Venezuela.

The CNE withdrew its invitation to Colombian observers for the elections on September 26th., which was probably done without consulting with the Board, Chavez put troops on alert at the border and within minutes the National Assembly should condemn Colombia.

Stay tuned!

19 Responses to “Venezuela breaks relations with Colombia (Again)”

  1. GWEH Says:

    Chavez does not want to risk vote… he does not have majority. The Caribbean Basin Security Initiative is strengthening US ties in the region. No coincidence Valenzuela on tour.

  2. GWEH Says:

    So he takes it to Unasur where he has a better chance

  3. GWEH Says:

    Don’t dis Maradona you know little of the man. He’s an ignorant fool who means no harm.

  4. moctavio Says:

    I am not dissing him, I am dissing Chavez who is making an announcement about “dignity” when he is meeting with a soccer player with a sordid past. Chavez should have better things to do than that.

  5. Gianni Says:

    On inner front, what’s better for him than to shout against an external enemy? And in “alert state” as president has even more power,,, as necessary may also abort elections!

    … But he with care will avoid any real military intervention against Colombia, just “bla-bla” and to show muscles. If he dares he and his Venezuelan army backed by Cubans will receive a hard lesson from Colombia backed by US…

  6. loroferoz Says:

    Always the showman, never a President.

  7. Kevin Says:

    Well, he’d better be a showman. He needs to sell tickets or something.

    The black market exchange rate has just doubled in 2 or 3 weeks if I remember quickly. If you can’t give them bread and circuses, you’d better give them a circus.

  8. NicaCat56 Says:

    Wait! Don’t you all think that he CREATED this situation in order to divert attention from the PUDREVAL chaos? I mean, just minutes after Chaderton embarassingly fumbles his way to the end of his time (who, BTW, seemed to be waiting for a phone call that never came!)? Not that he planned it, but it just “happened” when Maradroga was there? Too much of a coincidence, I think. I don’t know…I just think that he took advantage of the whole scenario, much to my (and others’) disgust.

  9. moctavio Says:

    Look screw Maradona, a former drug addict who did nothing for the Argentinian team (Yeah!). Why doesn’t Chavez have real heroes, instead of all of the shit of the world. Why don’t we imitate S. Korea, Chile, Singapore, Malysia, instead of Iran, N. Korea and all those losers.

    I know I am a nerd, but if that means my heroes are Yo Yo Ma, Vackla Havel and Richard Feynman, jeez, I prefer to live in my world.

    Fuck Chavez, Eva and Oliver Stone and all their friends!

    From my heart

    Your blogger

  10. deananash Says:

    When are the elections again? Don’t think that a small war would cause their postponement, do you?

  11. marc in calgary Says:

    Maradona, with the tattoo of his hero Che on his shoulder, a man that did so much harm, murdered so many innocents, spread his idiocy to so many others… No, I disagree that he is simply a fool. He’s turned his idiocy up a notch.

    He was, a great footballer. That was all. This new career of his is separate from his glory days, and should be judged separately.

  12. Roger Says:

    Chavez and company better have more than talk. For if Colombia sez there are 87 FARC camps in Venezuela, they have proof. Hell even the commercial remote sensing (satellite) companies can tell if you watered their clients grain option today! Also, these days the international movement of money and products are well documented. Even the dark stuff like malatins, or what seems to be the lack of them, turns up.

  13. bruni Says:

    Surely you are joking, Mr. Octavio!

    Really a nerd?

  14. moctavio Says:

    my next post: A rant about why I despise Maradona and where my true heroes lie.

  15. Ken Price Says:

    I suspect that the break in relations is more based on the fact that Venezuela is short of cash than anything Colombia has done. By breaking relations, Chavez can claim that shortages (primarily in foodstuffs) are due to the break, and not to his incompetence. “We had to break relations to maintain our dignity” will be his rant, and “we will make other arrangements, but they will take time”. Everything Chavez does is another excuse for his incompetence. He’s buying time, hoping for a miracle. His ONLY goal is to remain in power for as long as possible.

  16. Gonzalo Says:

    Please illustrate my ignorance…how different is Noriega´s case and charges to what Hugo Chavez should face (IF ANY). ??

  17. Roy Says:

    Chavez threatens to cut off oil exports to U.S. if Colombia attacks Venezuela…

    Yawn…

    Gonzalo,

    The difference is that Noriega was originally created by the U.S., and thus, the U.S. was morally responsible for assuring that Panama be saved from him and that he be punished.

    Chavez is purely a Venezuelan phenomenon, created for, by, and of Venezuela. The U.S. bears no moral responsibility for his rise to power in Venezuela. Chavez should meet his justice at the hands of Venezuelans.

  18. Gonzalo Says:

    Thanks Roy.

    Unfortunately Venezuelans do not have the power nor the moral to change things different to what they are. If the case is per your answer, then we will continue to be the narcos, guerrilleros, and corrupts paradise. Im not a believer nor Im dreaming with a USA takeover, but certainly if Chavez continues in power the USA will be harvesting his worst backyard enemy. Underestimating HRCF is like believing what happen during september 11 was not true or possible. Chavez is our phenomenon but certainly a monster that the USA should beware of and stop being in its comfort zone.

  19. Roy Says:

    Gonzalo,

    If you are correct that “… Venezuelans do not have the power nor the moral to change things different to what they are.”, then they deserve to be enslaved.

    However, I don’t think that is entirely the case. What is lacking is leadership. Let us see what kind of campaign the Oppos can put together this time around.

    I suppose that if Venezuela descended to some depths of depravity similar to “The Killing Fields” in Cambodia, then the U.S. might act. Short of that, Venezuela is on its own. As painful as it might be, if Venezuela can win this battle on its own, it will then be able to hold its head up strait and proud in Latin America. If it needs to be saved, no one will take Venezuela, or Venezuelans seriously for a long time to come.

    I remain somewhat hopeful that Venezuelans will “grow a pair” and do what is needed to win their freedom and dignity.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 11,599 other followers

%d bloggers like this: